Saturday, March 2, 2013

The Easter Kitchen - Creamy, Virginia Peanut Butter Filled Chocolate Eggs

From the Kitchens of Cheesecake Farms
www.CheesecakeFarms.com



Wow Them with Your Home Made Candy!


Every Easter we're asked for this recipe.

Old fashioned peanut butter crème hiding inside rich white, dark or traditional chocolate - it's the taste you crave every spring.

It's easier than you think so hop to it and be quick like a bunny!
You can't buy good taste like this!!


Hand Made, Home Made 
Creamy Virginia Peanut Butter Filled Chocolate Eggs

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Use semi sweet, milk or white chocolate confectionery coating for the shell

Makes 1 large egg
(measuring 5 1/2 X 3 3/4 inches with a volume of 1 1/4 cups)
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Creamy Virginia Peanut Butter Filling

8 oz. powdered sugar (sifted)
2 sticks butter (softened - margarine not recommended)
1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon white vegetable shortening (like Crisco)
1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon smooth peanut butter (regular commercial type - not fresh ground or natural style)
1 teaspoon salt

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Combine using a heavy duty mixer on low then beat on high 4 minutes.  Set a timer so you beat a full 4 minutes.  It's longer than you think so set the timer.   Do not under beat.

Cover bowl  (so it doesn't dry out) and set aside while making shell.


Chocolate Shell

1 1/4 cups confectionery coating (also called candy melts - discs or bars - semi sweet, milk or white - divided -  chocolate chips that are used for cookies not recommended)

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Put 3/4 of the chocolate into a microwave safe bowl.  Heat on high till almost melted - about one minute.

Remove from microwave. Chocolate may not look melted but will be soft.  Do not over heat.  Stir till smooth.

Immediately pour chocolate all at once into the mold. Spread evenly (The back of a coffee spoon works well.)

If the chocolate slides down the sides of the mold, briefly refrigerate the chocolate in the mold (30 seconds to 1 minute) and re-spread.

Wipe away any chocolate that extends beyond the top of the rim so the finished egg will look neat. 

Put into freezer and chill till firm - about 5 minutes.


Filling The Shell
When chocolate is set, spoon in the filling to 3/8 inch from top.

Melt remaining chocolate as before and pour it all at once onto filled shell, spreading quickly to cover. Make sure the chocolate seals the edges.

Return to freezer to set completely the chocolate - 3 to 5 minutes. 

Invert chilled egg onto a flat surface and pop out of mold.


Karla's Tips
Be sure to sift the powdered sugar.  The filling will not be as creamy as it should be if you don't sift.  Throw away any hard bits that remain in the sifter after all the sugar has passed through.

Heat white or colored chocolate for less time than you think.  Over heating makes them thicken, get grainy and burn.  Think roasting marshmallows over a camp fire.

If you made a mess with the chocolate shell before filling it (or it cracked or broke) just re-melt the chocolate and begin again.

If the shell cracked or broke after filling, continue with the recipe then melt some additional chocolate and patch or cover the crack with some decorative drizzling or other decoration.

Having trouble getting the finished egg out of the mold?  
The chocolate is not cold enough and hasn't completely set.  
When the chocolate is cold enough, it will (I promise!) pop out of the mold effort-less-ly.  
Never grease a chocolate mold or coat it with cooking spray.  It's the cold that does the trick.  (Chocolate chips, BTW, will stick to the mold every time.  They are specially formulated for cookies - not for molding chocolates.)  

This candy has no preservatives. It's not highly perishable but to make ahead and keep it fresh till Easter, let finished egg sit at room temperature for 3 to 4 hours to completely cool then wrap well and store in the freezer.  The refrigerator can be OK, if the egg is well wrapped and storage is short term, but chocolate generally builds up moisture in the refrigerator so the freezer is a better place for storage.

This same technique can be used to make any size egg.

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